There is a good chance you’ve utilized multi-factor authentication recently. When you sign into a new account and have to receive something like a code via text message to proceed. While it might seem like this extra step is an inconvenience, multi-factor authentication might actually protect you from some serious security inconveniences down the road.

Multi-factor authentication is becoming the industry norm these days, and for good reason. Our team weighs in on why we always recommend this to our clients on all of the digital systems they use.

Significantly increases security.

Generally, when you, or someone, want to sign in to your account your username and password are needed. When you add multi-factor authentication, another special code is required to be able to sign in. This code is usually sent via text message or accessed through an authentication app like Google Authenticator, and needs to be used immediately as it will quickly time out.

Basically, if someone other than you is trying to gain access to your account, they also need to have physical access to your phone. This can significantly reduce an intruder from hacking into your account as they most likely will not have your phone in hand. And can save you significant headaches in dealing with a breached account.

It’s so easy to use.

It just adds one small step to your login process. We’re not sure of another security measure that is so easy, yet so effective.

Many online offerings now require multi-factor authentication as their standard. However, many common systems, like Google, still have their two-step verification set up an option. But why not opt in? No matter what your account is, sensitive (bank, medical, etc.) or not, we highly recommend adding this extra step. It’s incredibly simple and it truly helps keep your information more secure.

Protects you for the future.

We have to assume every account we have can be compromised by a leak of login information or for another reason. Adding multi-factor is really important to create security for your accounts.

It adds that layer of protection. And while that account you just created might seem insignificant to you today, why not protect yourself down the road just in case?

BONUS TIP

Avoid using security questions, because most of the answers are easily found by doing some basic searching on social media or background checks. If you have to use a security question, use either intentionally wrong answers or code it in some way.

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